Dick dale misirlou twist peppermint man


Big band chart, jazz band, arrangement, orchestation, swing band, drums, baritone saxophone, bari sax, alto sax, tenor sax, clainet, cello, flute, viola, horns in F, C melody saxophone, cornet, 1st trumpet, violin, trombone, piano, guitar, bass, drums, sheet music, combo, jump, waltz, dance, fox-trot, dixieland jazz, pop, rock, blues, country music, Frank Sinatra, Vocal charts, instrumental music, rhumba, rumba, cha-cha, tango, bolero, mambo, show tunes, male vocal, female vocal, classic jazz, 1910, 1020's, 1930's, 1940's, 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, 1980's, 1990's, jive, hot tunes, top 40, hit parade, billboard to 100, radio music, theater orchestra music, pit orchestra, movie music, classical music, musician, Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Fletcher Henderson, Ella Fitzgerald, George Gershwin, Harry Warren, Glenn Gray, Benny Goodman, Harry Cinick, Diana Krall, The Beatles, Bobby Darin, Les Paul, Jan Savitt, Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, Fred Atair, Lew Brown, Les Brown, Cole Porter, Stan Kenton, Vernon Duke, . Handy, Johnny Mercer, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Milton Ager, Neil Diamond, Richard Rodgers, Leroy Anderson, Gene Krupa, Clarence "Pine Top" Smith, Sammy Nestico, Ray Noble, Donald Redman, Don Redman, Walter Donaldson, Will Hudson, Neal Hefti, . Polla, Frank Metis, Perez Prado, Frankie Carle, Walter Paul, Jimmy Dale, Larry Wagner, Charlie Hathaway, Frank Skinner, Gordan Jenkins, Fud Livingston, Art McKay, Jerry Nowak, Frank Metis, Graham Prince, Roger Holmes, Mornay D. Helm, Hawley Ades, Bill Holcombe, Buddy Rich, Gene Krupa, Louis Bellson, Lou Halmy, Lou Singer, Teddy Black, Vic Schoen, Chuck Bradford, Jerry Sears, Larry Clinton, Johnny Sterling, Gordon Jenkins, Fabian Andre, afro cuban, samba, Small Orchestra, Andrew Sisters, Bing Crosby, Fred Mac Murray, Dick Powell, Alice Faye, Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland, Noble Sissle and his orchestra, Quincy Jones, Bill Robinson, Cab Calloway, Tony Martin, "George Whites Scandles", GInger Rogers, Gene Autry, James Brown, W. C. Fields, Marx Bros, Allan Jones, Maureen o'Sullivan, Ted Fio Rito, and his orchestra, Kay Kyser, Isham Jones, Woody Herman, The Surfaris, Casa Loma Orchestra, Petula Clark, Ethel Waters, Louie Bellson, Shirley Temple, Xavier Cugat, Jimmie Lunceford, Louis Armstrong, Phil Harris & his Orchestra.

Early 1960s surf music, however, was what really pushed electric guitars to the forefront of popular music in an as-yet unheard way. Surf music was a youthful Southern California phenomenon, and Fender was a youthful Southern California company that made well built and eminently affordable guitars right where and when the action was happening. With hindsight, it seems like it should’ve been no surprise that Fender guitars naturally became the surf guitars. In fact though, this did come as a surprise to Fender, and a happy one at that—the development boded especially well for the previously mis-targeted Jazzmaster and its somewhat struggling predecessor, the Stratocaster.

Boston —This perfectionist classic rock band, which scored with one of the best-selling debut albums of all-time, wasn’t very prolific afterwards but still retains a huge fan base.

Folge 577 - ** Thema: Letzte Elvis-Session der 50er Jahre
Vito Picone und The Elegents
Original Wortprotokoll Werner Voss

  • Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires - I Need Your Love Tonight
  • Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires - A Big Hunk O'Love
  • Eddie Riff - Ain't That Lovin' You, Baby
  • Elvis Presley - Ain't That Lovin' You Baby
  • Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires - (Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As I
  • Elvis Presley - I Got Stung
  • Eddie Riff - My Baby's Gone Away
  • Mister Ruffin (aka Eddie Riff) - Bring It On Back
  • The Cavaliers - Dance, Dance, Dance
  • Pat Cordel & The Crescents - Darling Come Back
  • The Elegants - Little Star
  • The Elegants - Getting Dizzy
  • The Elegants - Please Believe Me
  • The Elegants - True Love Affair
  • The Elegants - Pay Day
  • The Elegants - Spiral
  • The Elegants - I've Seen Everything
  • Russ Veers - Warm As Toast
  • The Rhythm Aces - Mohawk Rock
 

For legions of Americans, the iconic Capitol orange & yellow swirl 45rpm label is synonymous with The Beach Boys and/or The Beatles, and a time in US history when California was at the center of our cultural revolution. For me, however, it represents Capitol's impressive–albeit largely obscure–catalog of 1960's soul and R&B.

Capitol began the 60s with a stable of whitebread hitmakers such as The Kingston Trio, The Four Preps & The Four Freshmen, along with a revolving door of teens, TV stars & novelty acts. Thankfully, that all changed in 1963–first with the arrival of Surf Music, and then with the British Invasion. (One thing that didn't change, however, was Capitol's lucrative country music roster; roughly 25% of the releases in this discography are country.)

Simultaneously, Capitol was also producing top-notch soul music from studios in California, Nashville & New York; but while classy, soulful acts like Nat King Cole, Nancy Wilson & Lou Rawls frequently hit the charts, relatively few of the other soul releases made a dent, and most disappeared without a trace. So when I went surfing for a discography to identify these lost soul sides, I was surprised to find that there wasn't one.

Until now.

I've added some general notes and trivia below:

1. This discography is for 45rpm singles that follow the numeric numbering system associated with the main Capitol label only, which include a few Deltone, Colossal, KEF, Trump, Chips & Apple releases. Subsidiary labels that have unique numbering series like Tower, Sidewalk & Uptown are not included. I'll add another discography for promo/custom singles in the future.

2. The orange & yellow "swirl" design replaced Capitol's long-standing purple label, and was in use (in the .) from December 1961 until March 1969. However, earlier hits–like Robert Mitchum's "The Ballad Of Thunder Road" [#3986] from 1958 (which surprisingly re-entered the Hot 100 Chart in early 1962) were repressed/reissued on the swirl label.

3. During the swirl's inaugural period, a few releases were pressed with both purple & swirl labels, which makes it difficult to pinpoint the swirl's actual debut. The earliest example I've found is Bobby Edwards' "What's The Reason" [#4674] from December, 1961.

4. Many of the records listed are extremely rare & hard to find, and in a couple of cases, only one or two copies are known to exist (. "Address Unknown" by The Baystaters).

5. Capitol's numbering system is very confusing because they reused the same series numbers: the 2000 & 3000 series from the 50s were recycled in the late 60s & early 70s, and the 4000 & 5000 series were reused in the 70s & 80s. To add confusion, the LP 2000 series that started in 1963 ran concurrently with the later 2000 series of 45s.

6. Capitol 45s typically sound awful--even those that have never been played--due in part to the company's notorious practice of recycling vinyl. The bulk of 45s were pressed either at the Los Angeles plant (identified by an asterisk or star in the run-out deadwax on each side) or the Scranton, PA plant (identified by a triangular IAM stamp in the run-out deadwax on each side.) I've found that the Scranton pressings sound marginally better.

7. In July, 1968, Capitol switched to a design where the label size was reduced to accommodate a patented ridged ring that would prevent slippage when 45s were stacked on a turntable. This is also when they began routinely issuing singles in Stereo.

8. Red entries in the discography are unreleased or currently unknown.

9. Yellow entries are tentative and need verification. If you have info on these or unknown titles--or corrections--please send me an email with proof , preferably a label scan.

10. I'll complete the Stereo/Mono listings over time.

11. I've embedded some Amazon product links for tracks that are legitimately available on CD or mp3. The process is ongoing and is by no means intended to be comprehensive. I won't link to products that are of dubious copyright or mastering (translation: bootlegs and vinyl transfers).

12. If a song placed on Billboard's Hot 100, Country, R&B or Adult-Contemporary charts, its highest position is listed in [brackets] after the title.

13. This discography is © copyrighted.


*The DATE column reflects a general calendar timeline, when the bulk of releases appeared in Billboard singles reviews. Records were not released in numeric order, so actual release dates (when known) may differ from the calendar. Capitol briefly used a release date code on the label from September 1962 to August 1964 (which I'll add later).


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